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BOOKS

1. Small Steps Forward: Using Games and Activities to Help Your Pre-school Child with Special Needs

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers (1 June 1999)
Author: Sarah Newman

Description:
Provides parents of children diagnosed with Downs Syndrome, autism and other forms of developmental delay with the information they require and a range of ideas to encourage their child's development. The text suggests games and activities using toys and materials which most children will already have, involving no special preparation. The author divides skills into five areas - social, physical, intellectual, emotional and linguistic - for convenient reference. She deals with general issues, such as behaviour management, toilet-training and sleep-management, which may be encountered by parents of children with any form of disability - physical, learning or sensory. She provides the outline of child development so that parents can place their child's progress. Advice on coping with the stress of having a child with special needs, and information on support parents can expect from health, education and social services is also given. The author includes a comprehensive resources section, which incorporates a bibliography and a list of useful addresses.


 
2. Stepping Out: Using Games and Activities to Help Your Child with Special Needs

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 1 edition (29 November 2003)
Author: Sarah Newman

Description:
Parents and carers of children with conditions such as autism, Down's Syndrome or other forms of developmental delay can do much to help encourage their child's development. Stepping Out provides parents and carers with practical advice, and fun games and activities to improve a child's skills in the six areas of development: cognitive; physical; sensory; language; social and emotional. The book also outlines the stages of child development so parents can place their child's progress in context. This book is particularly suitable for primary school children, exploring the standard stages of development in children aged 3 to 11. Sarah Newman tackles many general problems, such as sleep, behaviour and toilet training, which may be encountered by parents of children with any form of disability - physical, learning or sensory. Drawing on her own experience, the author offers advice for parents on coping with the stress of caring for a child with special needs and discusses issues associated with education. This illustrated book offers a wealth of information and imaginative ideas, with a comprehensive resources section.

 
3.  Visual Impairment: Access to Education for Children and Young People

Publisher:David Fulton Publishers; First Edition edition (1 Nov 1997)
Author: Heather Mason, Stephen McCall

Description:
Written for parent and professionals working with children and young people with visual impairment, this work examines the causes of eye conditions and additional disabilities; how these can restrict access to the mainstream curriculum; and ways in which the effects can be ameliorated. Central to the text is entitlement. National Curriculum areas are discussed, and attention is given to both the hidden curriculum and specialist curriculum and extra curricula activities, and to the competencies required by staff working with these children and young people.

4. Independent Movement and Travel in Blind Children: A Promotion Model (PB) (Critical Concerns in Blindness)
Author: Joseph Cutter
The purpose of this book is to contribute to our understanding of Developmental O and M, independent movement and travel in blind children. Unlike many books and articles on orientation and mobility (O&M) for blind children, this one is not about the effect of blindness on movement. Such an inquiry is self-defeating from the start, as it often begins with misconceptions and deficit-thinking about blindness and the blind child s early motor development. Instead, this book is about the effect of movement on development and the importance of movement experiences for the development of independent movement and travel in blind children. It has a clear premise: blind children must become "active movers" if they are to become independent "travelers."

 

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